Common Visitor Visa Interview Questions

Posted by Matthew Green | Jun 12, 2014 | 0 Comments

If you are working your way through the visa application process, you will undoubtedly find that there are a lot of steps involved. One of the best things you can do, as a visa applicant, is be as prepared as possible. One way to do this is review the commonly asked questions used during a typical visa interview.

Many sample questions are available on immihelp.com. Keep in mind that no matter what question you are asked, you need to answer honestly and to the best of your knowledge.

This list includes some, but not all, of the questions you may be asked in reference to your visit:

(1) Why do you want to travel to the United States?
(2) Why do you want to visit at this specific time?
(3) How long will you be staying in the United States?
(4) Why do you want to stay in the United States for that specific amount of time? Are you unable to complete your trip in a shorter time period?
(5) Where will you stay in the United States? Make sure you are familiar with the address before your interview and ensure that the address is the same as what was provided in your application.
(6) How much will this trip cost? For this question, you should have your sponsor documents ready.

Next, you will be asked questions related to your sponsor, as well as any relatives you may have in the United States. These questions will likely be asked during this section:

(1) Who is sponsoring you? If the answer to this question is either a son or daughter, follow-up questions will likely include:
(a) Is your son/daughter married?
(b) Does your son/daughter have children?
(c ) When is your child's birthday?
(d) What does your child do for work?
(e) What is your child's contact information?
(2) Do you have other relatives in the US?
(3) How long have they been in the US?

In addition, there will be questions about the logistics of your trip. These include, but are not limited to:

(1) Have you already purchased your airline ticket?
(2) Have you traveled internationally before?
(3) Have you traveled to the US before?
(4) When you traveled to the US before, where did you stay? For how long?
(5) Will a spouse be traveling with you on this trip?
(6) Do you have a credit card?
(7) Have you obtained visitor medical insurance?

You will also be asked questions pertaining to your everyday life in your home country. These questions will likely include the following:

(1) What do you do for work in your home country?
(2) If you do work, how are you able to visit the US for an extended period of time?
(3) What is your annual income?
(4) Do you plan on working while you are in the US?

In almost all cases, the interviewer will ask you questions in order to make sure that you plan on returning to your home country at the end of the scheduled visit to the US. Questions during this part of the interview may include:

(1) Will you return to your home country after your visit?
(2) How can you assure me that you will return?
(3) Who will take care of your property while you are away?
(4) Do you have relatives in your home country? Do you have children there?

At the end of the interview, you will most likely be asked miscellaneous questions related to your visit to the U.S. These may include:

(1) Do you pay income tax?
(2) Are you going to the US for a terrorist activity?
(3) Currently, who lives with you and what do they do?
(4) Do you have a vehicle?

These questions are just a sample of what you may be asked when you attend your visa interview. It is a good idea to review these and other questions before you go to your interview. Being prepared will be beneficial in this process.

About the Author

Matthew Green

The Law Offices of Matthew H. Green focuses on the aggressive defense of immigrants. A native of Arizona, Mr. Green understands the difficulties that immigrants and families of immigrants face when a loved one is charged...

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